GPS Tracking For International Deliveries

The beauty of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) is that they are just that, global. Any vehicle system, vehicle or device that employs a GPS tracker can be located pretty much anywhere across the planet. The commercial uses for such pinpoint accuracy are growing daily but for lots of companies the ability to allocate and distribute […]

GPS Tracking For International Deliveries

The beauty of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) is that they are just that, global. Any vehicle system, vehicle or device that employs a GPS tracker can be located pretty much anywhere across the planet. The commercial uses for such pinpoint accuracy are growing daily but for lots of companies the ability to allocate and distribute resources have been revolutionised in recent years by fitting GPS trackers to their fleet vehicles.

GPS tracking with its worldwide coverage and live tracking feeds has made parcel delivery and courier services a lot simpler. Fleet Managers and Delivery Controllers are able to instantly tell where their customer’s goods are and whether there is likely to be a delay, expected time of delivery and real-time progress reports.

The use of GPS tracer units has also changed the perception of parcel delivery from the customer’s perspective. Once delivery times were vague and parcels could easily get lost for weeks upon end, these days it’s more likely that a company will now know exactly where that much anticipated delivery is en-route and just when there will be a knock at the door.

This ability to asset track means that even if the courier company is having difficulty locating the final delivery point they are still able to inform the customer where their post is currently being held. For many customers even just the knowledge of where their goods are in transit is better than nothing at all.

The two main types of GPS tracking systems that are used are data loggers and data pushers.

Data loggers have an in-built memory chip and record the journey taken by the monitored vehicle, recording preset perimeters onto either a memory card or an internal flash memory. This data can be later retrieved and downloaded to give a detailed report of the driver’s journey, providing information about location, speed and direction.

Data pushers are the most common GPS tracker used in delivery and postal services as they give a real time tracking ability and an up to the minute location guide or can be set to transmit updated location data at preset intervals. Along with live updates over internet websites these vehicle monitoring systems can also produce downloadable reports for later analysis of the vehicle’s journey and include a range of positional, altitude and status reports.

The commercial implications for GPS delivery tracking have been immense and along with better and more reliable delivery companies find that they also save money on running costs such as fuel and vehicle maintenance, lower insurance rates and more efficient working patterns.

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